School Girl Fancy Dress – 3 Outfit Suggestions For an Adult School Girl Costume

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Along with nurses uniforms and french maid outfits, school girl fancy dress costumes are renowned for being one of the most popular types of adult dressing up and role play outfits. This may very well be true, but the adult school girl costume is also very popular at Halloween, school reunions, seventies discos and on Hen nights. Overall, this must be considered to be one of the best value for money costumes you can buy, seeing as there are so many opportunities to wear it, so no wonder it is so popular. Below are 3 adult school girl costume suggestions that you may want to consider if you are searching for a sexy outfit to wear to the upcoming costume party and would like something that you might make further use of in the future.

Outfit Suggestion 1: Classic British look

This is basically an adult version of the type of uniform that you yourself would have worn while at school. These work particularly well at school reunions and the school disco nights that many of the night clubs have from time to time.

The advantage of the classic British look is that it is one of the few outfits that pretty much anyone can make themselves and still look authentic. A grey cardigan, white shirt, short black skirt, sensible black shoes and your old school tie and you have yourself a costume. However, it is good to remember that there are bought costumes out there that will look much better, so at the end of the day it will come down to budget.

Outfit Suggestion 2: American High School look

If you want to look a little bit different to the other school girls at the party, then you could always go for an American High School look. You will have probably seen this type of uniform in dozens of chick flicks over the years and these types of outfits are now available online. If you do not fancy the classic High School look, you could always opt for a cheerleader or nerd outfit instead.

Outfit Suggestion 3: Naughty Prep School look

If you want to wear something a little bit more sexy, whether it be for the party, the bedroom, or both, then a naughty Prep School outfit might be your best choice. These are quite often based around a tartan mini-dress, or a white blouse and tartan mini-skirt, knee-high white stockings and black chunky heeled shoes.

Remember that these so called “private boarding school outfits” range from being a little bit risqué to downright slutty, so choose something that you are going to feel confident wearing and which is suitable for the event in question.

BONUS Suggestion: Accessories are key

At School Girl Fancy Dress [http://schoolgirlfancydress.com], not only can you choose from a wide range of great value school uniform fancy dress outfits, including the different types of adult school girl costume described above, but you can also purchase the types of accessories needed to make your outfit as authentic as possible.

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Teaching Those in the Venerable Years – Mental Fitness For Older Adults

I feel caught in our cultural myth that aging is a failure, that if only I did it right I could avoid old age, even avoid death. What a peculiar notion! We have some ideas that as we age we are no longer sexy, vital, juicy. Sometimes when I walk into a room I feel as if I’m invisible, or even worse, an outcast.-Lee Lipp

I’m well aware of the fact that I’m old. By the way, I used to say “old,” but now when I’m asked in interviews, “How old are you?” I reply, “Well, I grew up in China in a time when age was venerated, so I am eighty six years venerable.-Huston Smith

I’ve found that venerating the elderly grounds my teaching for older adults. It’s an attitude of respect, attention, patience and love that makes my teaching rewarding and hopefully of some service. During the late 60′s when it was not hip to trust anyone over 30, I subtly discounted their exquisite value. Luckily, I soon learned to appreciate the wisdom and richness of the older generation while at the same time being able to think for myself.

As a young boy, I found older adults to be fascinating, somewhat mysterious and, when not playing sports or in school, I was very happy in their company. When I was in grammar school, I visited older neighbors who didn’t seem to have younger people around them. One day I was walking past a fairly run-down, large home where “Mrs. Davenport” was pruning some bushes in her front yard. She lived alone, and seemed to be a recluse. She also had the reputation of being a mean shrew, and instilled fear in the kids who sometimes played pranks on her. But on this particular occasion, she asked me if I would help her lift some trimmings into a wheelbarrow, which I did, while casting a suspicious eye on her, remembering some of the children said she was a bona fide witch.

Apart from her unsmiling wizened face, I found nothing sinister about her. Her comments on plants, flowers, trees, squirrels, rabbits, muskrats, dogs and cats started to fascinate me. She never spoke about other people except saying that a group of “lousy boys” had thrown rocks at her dogs. After I finished, she invited me to enjoy freshly baked cookies. That began our friendship. I started visiting her, walking down the long driveway, knocking on her door and gaining entrance into magical conversations about topics new to me. I looked at her photo albums and inspected her “favorite contraptions.” Once I opened a painted music box, inlaid with white-spotted black and orange butterflies–I marveled as the box released a melody that brought such delight to Mrs. Davenport, her face noticeably softened.

Now I find myself revering my older students, as naturally, as happily as greeting my family when they come home from a trip. It’s a joy for me to be with older adults, learning and teaching. I am learning that our brains are elastic, that we can “stretch” our minds just as we stretch our bodies, even as we age. Neuroscientists call this ability of the brain to keep itself fit, “brain plasticity.” The course I teach, through adult school, in convalescent hospitals is called “Mental Fitness.”

In classes with our venerable seniors, we offer exercise (including simple Tai Chi), music and singing, arts-crafts, academics (history-geography; language arts; math life skills), puzzles, lively questions & answers about trivia, video documentaries & educational movies. We create an atmosphere where seniors can stay mentally active, at whatever level may be possible for as long as possible.

Different animals are brought into my class at the convalescent hospital-hospice. Of course some of the clients don’t want to be close to any animal, yet many do and find it great fun and excitement, like having an instant “buddy.” No judgments about being old. The furry ones make many clients feel relaxed, in what can be an alienating, colorless environment. A 93 year old resident is happily interacting with the fat kitty cat; so energizing for her. The animals brighten the classroom.

We discuss health and nutrition. We review studies-such as those by Dr. Andrew Weil-which recommend that seniors include plenty of antioxidant-rich vegetables and fruits, such as blueberries. And to include anti-inflammation vitamin C (found in citrus fruits, beans, oatmeal, enriched pastas, peas, wheat germ, rice bran) and vitamin E (in spinach, sunflower seeds, whole grains, wheat germ); as well as omega-3 fatty acids (in salmon, flax-seed oil, walnuts, supplements that provide these fatty acids). Dr. Weil cites studies from scientists at the University of Irvine (with mice) that show DHA (an omega-3 fatty acid) delays the development of protein “tangles” in brain cells and also reduces levels of beta amyloid. (Cf. The Journal of Neuroscience, April 18, 2007)

Research suggests that doing such activities as educational “trivia”, learning a language or playing a musical instrument may help build reserve brain cells to fight against failing mental ability. So we do lots of trivia and word games, both oral and written. We encourage stimulating the imagination, forming mental pictures to associate with information, using the force of our attention and memory, still learning and “connecting,” and “re-connecting.”

Some convalescent homes and senior adult programs have computers, with such programs as “Posit Brain Fitness.” Computers provide effective exercises to sharpen the minds of older adults. I did some of the sessions from a Brain Fitness Course from Posit Science where I and my fellow and sister seniors did different exercises to listen more attentively, to focus and concentrate, to improve our ability to process information and to remember progressively larger amounts of information. For example, we distinguish varying sounds; we remember details from stories. We are experiencing how our brains can change when we are paying attention, how we can improve the speed with which we process information and nudge our ability to communicate more effectively. I’ve done five different exercises: 1. “High or Low?” helps faster sound processing, so the brain can respond even to fast speech in conversation; 2. “Tell Us Apart” gives the brain practice to distinguish similar sounds so it can better interpret the spoken word while storing clear memories; 3. “Match It!” helps the brain remember better, as the brain processes sounds with more clarity; 4. “Sound Replay” stimulates the brain to remember information in the order it’s presented; 5. “Listen and Do” exercises the short-term memory, which is critical in most cognitive tasks related to thinking.

“Dakim’s [m] Power” is another computer-based program which aids in slowing down memory degeneration by “matching” and “word” games, answering questions. Multiple level activities are available: for “high functioning,” for “mild cognition impairment,” and for those with “dementia.” Seniors may review history or geography or watch clips from old movies where they are asked to remember setting, characters, and actions. Some of the hospitals and senior centers use the involving world of the Internet to look up information of interest, e-mail and chat.

Sadly, many of our students already suffer from the brain-clogging plaque (amyloid) and protein tangles of advanced Alzheimer’s and other dementia that greatly limit memory and cognition, and may manifest in behavioral abnormalities. But even Alzheimer’s doesn’t exclude meaningful educational and social interaction, even if it is on a basic level. We continue to reassure, interact, creatively stimulate, listen, be with, teach and learn from. We have some fun and laughter together, even in this drastic-terribly sorrowful-situation of a slow, progressive diminishing of mental capacity.

Our students are often confused, disoriented, incoherent, alienated, angry, withdrawn, in slowly deteriorating conditions. Their words don’t seem to express their thoughts. Some of our students appear “just out of it.” We are aware of changing needs and must adapt, be responsive and understanding. It’s messy sometimes; we accept all of it. These students are losing nerve cells that are associated with learning, judgment, memory. The chemical acetylcholine-which is used by nerve cells to transmit messages-is decreasing dramatically.

One of my students greeted me each morning saying with a perplexed look: “I can’t remember what I forgot to remember to tell you.” Her daughter would visit her in class, but had to tell her each time that she was her daughter. She enjoyed going to class, especially singing and humming old songs; playing catch with a soft ball; listening to stories. However, there were times when she would sit with a blank expression on her face. J. Madeleine Nash writes: “Imagine your brain as a house filled with lights. Now imagine someone turning off the lights one by one. That’ what Alzheimer’s disease does. It turns off the lights so that the flow of ideas, emotions and memories from one room to the next slows and eventually ceases.” (Time magazine, July 17, 2000) Though we cannot stop this process in our students, we do our best to accompany them, continuing to shine lights of caring on them.

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5 Reasons To Go To An Online High School

Online high schools are becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to traditional high schools. While they are not without their own unique set of problems, online high schools, particularly those which allow for earning a high school diploma online, will only grow in number and popularity.

While there are a number of different reasons for why a student might elect to attend an online high school, below are five popular reasons:

1. If you are an adult student, it can be infinitely less embarrassing to go online. Most adult students have little desire to be in class with 16-year-olds (or even in an adult school class with 19-year-olds). Online no one knows how old you are and you can be faceless in a very real sense.

2. It gets you out of the public schools (in most cases; remember there are some free online high schools that are public charter schools). While we have many excellent schools in the United States, we also have some schools which are struggling.

3. If you have an illness that prevents you from going to high school, this can be a good alternative. While not always the best choice for students who are ill, it can be a reasonable alternative to what the public schools might be able to offer in that same situation.

4. You have been asked – ahem – to leave your high school for whatever reason. You definitely still want to earn a high school diploma and this may be one of your very few options depending on your location.

5. You just know that, if you stay in your local public high school, you will never finish. That environment is not for everyone. Some will be successful, but for others it will be a real challenge.

However and importantly, online high schools require students to be motivated. Remember that in traditional schools you have teachers pushing you forward. While many online high schools have teachers, the dynamic is different. It will be much more on you to be successful.

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How to Be a Successful Adult Student – Overview of Four Classroom Skills

Having made a decision to be an adult student, there are some classroom skills of which you need to make sure you have a working mastery. In high school, you could get by without really getting a complete grasp of these skills, but this is no longer true when you become an adult learner. These skills include taking notes, taking tests, listening, and participating.

In secondary school, the instructors are very forgiving. They know the students have not had a full course of training in these skills; towards the end of your high school career, the teachers make noises about the necessity of having these skills, but by then most students have learned to ignore such talk. However, an instructor of adults makes the assumption that you have these skills; otherwise, you would not have agreed to be a student in the adult education world.

All of these skills can be acquired; there are many resources available to teach these skills. Unfortunately, you must go and get these skills; no one will come and give them to you automatically. Many adult schools, recognizing that grade school has not taught these skills, have a course for entering students to teach these skills. Once this course is done, the instructors then assume that the student has the skills, and they, the instructors, move forward without covering these skills again. This means that the instructors move much faster in adult education than they do in secondary education, for after all, the students have been taught the skills to keep up. Unfortunately, many students treat the introductory course like a high school course, ignoring much of what is covered, and then the student is caught in a bind, not having the skills to make proper use of the adult courses in which they are participating.

Taking Notes

Taking notes, in adult education, does not consist of simply writing down whatever the instructor says. First, the instructor is probably moving too fast for a student to be able to write down everything, and second, the instructor often does not distinguish between main points and explanatory material. When taking notes, the students must move fast enough to keep up with the instructor, move precisely enough to distinguish between points and explanations, and move efficiently enough to have the notes usable after the class is over.

The point of the notes is not to memorize the material presented in the class. First, the material covered is typically in the textbook provided by the course, so it can be reread there in the book. Second, the instructor is not trying to present concepts that are completely new, for he has made the assumption that the student has read the book. No, what the instructor is doing in class is providing details and examples to explain the concept to which the textbook introduces the student. Therefore, the notes should be also about in depth details and understanding examples. The student notes should be clearly structured to differentiate between explanations and examples. This allows the notes to be useful outside of class, as well as providing the student with a source of questions for clarification.

Taking Tests

The tests of adult education are often not the main component of the course grade; instead, the tests are to allow the instructor to determine which students are maintaining the pace of the class and which students are not. Memorization usually has little or no meaning; instead, the test consists of examples and problems where the student can exhibit their understanding of the material. Therefore, unlike high school, memorizing material is not very helpful to an adult student.

Instead, the student should prepare for tests by doing problems. Understanding the problems from both the textbook and the lecture is much more important than being able to spout forth a word perfect definition. The test is about doing, not regurgitating (or at least it should be). The student needs to practice and be relaxed, rather than review details and be nervous. Taking tests is as much about how the student approaches the problem as it about getting the one right answer. In many cases, there is no one right answer, or if there is one answer, there are multiple ways of determining the answer.

When taking tests, the student should know their target for that test, and should focus on getting the material needed to reach that target. Once that has been acquired, the student should cease to focus on the test and focus on themselves. Only then can they use the material they have gathered most effectively.

Listening

Many times students do not listen to the instructor; instead, they hear what they expect to hear, even if the instructor is saying something completely different. In high school, the teachers do at least some effort to clear up these potential communication errors. In adult education, it is the responsibility of the student to assure that what they heard is what the instructor said. That is why listening becomes such an important skill.

Listening requires that you are properly prepared, that you pay adequate attention, and that you review your notes and thoughts after class; all this work is to make sure you have heard what the instructor has said. The instructor will hold the adult student responsible, and the student is left with the necessity of satisfying that expectation.

Participation

In high school, simply attending class was often adequate participation; in adult education, participation must be more active. Once the responsibility of understanding moves from the teacher (as in high school) to the student (adult education), passive participation is rarely enough to ensure adequate communication. The student needs to ask questions, restate ideas, and explore possibilities, for the teacher is expecting the student to provide the initiative. While a student might passively attend class, they will not achieve proper learning without active participation.

Learnable Skills

All these skills, and other discussed elsewhere in this series, are learnable by any student. Once a person has decided to become an adult student, learning these skills is a necessary action to achieve a successful completion of the program of study. Not everything has to be learned immediately, but a student who is committed to their success as an adult student will start working on these skills, and the sooner the better. Most instructors, if approached by a student, will be glad to guide and mentor students, but the initiative must come from the student. After all, it is their success at stake.

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School Girl Fancy Dress – 3 Outfit Suggestions For an Adult School Girl Costume

Along with nurses uniforms and french maid outfits, school girl fancy dress costumes are renowned for being one of the most popular types of adult dressing up and role play outfits. This may very well be true, but the adult school girl costume is also very popular at Halloween, school reunions, seventies discos and on Hen nights. Overall, this must be considered to be one of the best value for money costumes you can buy, seeing as there are so many opportunities to wear it, so no wonder it is so popular. Below are 3 adult school girl costume suggestions that you may want to consider if you are searching for a sexy outfit to wear to the upcoming costume party and would like something that you might make further use of in the future.

Outfit Suggestion 1: Classic British look

This is basically an adult version of the type of uniform that you yourself would have worn while at school. These work particularly well at school reunions and the school disco nights that many of the night clubs have from time to time.

The advantage of the classic British look is that it is one of the few outfits that pretty much anyone can make themselves and still look authentic. A grey cardigan, white shirt, short black skirt, sensible black shoes and your old school tie and you have yourself a costume. However, it is good to remember that there are bought costumes out there that will look much better, so at the end of the day it will come down to budget.

Outfit Suggestion 2: American High School look

If you want to look a little bit different to the other school girls at the party, then you could always go for an American High School look. You will have probably seen this type of uniform in dozens of chick flicks over the years and these types of outfits are now available online. If you do not fancy the classic High School look, you could always opt for a cheerleader or nerd outfit instead.

Outfit Suggestion 3: Naughty Prep School look

If you want to wear something a little bit more sexy, whether it be for the party, the bedroom, or both, then a naughty Prep School outfit might be your best choice. These are quite often based around a tartan mini-dress, or a white blouse and tartan mini-skirt, knee-high white stockings and black chunky heeled shoes.

Remember that these so called “private boarding school outfits” range from being a little bit risqué to downright slutty, so choose something that you are going to feel confident wearing and which is suitable for the event in question.

BONUS Suggestion: Accessories are key

At School Girl Fancy Dress [http://schoolgirlfancydress.com], not only can you choose from a wide range of great value school uniform fancy dress outfits, including the different types of adult school girl costume described above, but you can also purchase the types of accessories needed to make your outfit as authentic as possible.

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